The Packard Eight Sedan From 1948 – A Classic Car

The Packard Eight Sedan from 1948 is the American car that was widely used shortly after the Second World War. Robust and reliable, this 1948 Packard Eight Sedan is certain and that is what the Americans wanted on a limited budget. You could find the Packard Eight Sedan in the cities and in the countryside where more and more families started to settle. This painting of a Packard Eight Sedan from 1948 can be printed very large on various materials. - BUY THIS PRINT AT FINE ART AMERICA ENGLISH https://janke.pixels.com/featured/packard-eight-sedan-lateral-view-jan-keteleer.html WADM / OH MY PRINTS DUTCH / FRENCH / GERMAN https://www.werkaandemuur.nl/nl/shopwerk/Packard-Eight-Sedan-zijaanzicht/738519/132?mediumId=11&size=75x50 -

The 1948 Packard Eight Station Sedan was an affordable and reliable car that helped the company build a successful company during the post-World War II era. It was the most popular of the Packard models during this period, accounting for over one-third of the total production in 1948. Its stylish body featured a wood tailgate door, which pioneered a new style. The classic car has the look of a traditional family sedan, but with the convenience of a sports car.

In the mid-1990s, the Packard Eight Sedan received cosmetic and mechanical restoration. The hood was restyled to look like an ox-yoke, and the lower grille featured "inverted bathtub" body lines. In the summer of 1948, Packard began producing a new body style called the Station Wagon. It was a woody station wagon designed by a southern collector and offered a 127-inch platform. The custom 'Sedan' was the first model to feature a convertible.

After the war, Packard focused on its Clipper styling for the upper-class sedan. This design was carried over to 1948, and the Custom Super Clipper and Super Eight were built. After 1947, the latter was dropped from the line, and the senior Super Eight One-Eighty was renamed the Custom Eight. The lower-priced Super Eight One-Sixty was named the Super Eight. The two new models were closely related to each other, with the exception of the eggcrate grille and small rear chrome trim. The 1949 Packard Station Sedan was replaced with the Deluxe model.